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ECLIPSE

 

|| ECLIPSE ||

 

On March 29, 2006, a total solar eclipse occured when the new moon moved directly between the sun and the earth. The moon’s shadow fell on the eastern tip of Brazil, sped eastward across the Atlantic, through northern Africa, across the Mediterranean, and into Turkey, where an Exploratorium team was waiting.

Path of Totality

To view a total solar eclipse, you have to be somewhere along the narrow path of totality, where the moon’s dark umbral shadow falls onto the earth’s surface. The path of totality for this eclipse is shown above. Our location in Side, Turkey, is marked with a star.
Total Lunar Eclipse of March 03


The first of two total lunar eclipses in 2007 is unique in that it is partly visible from every continent around the world. The eclipse occurs at the descending node, 3.2 days before apogee and 1.9 days after the Moon occults Saturn (northern and eastern Europe). During the eclipse, the Moon is in southern Leo, about 13º east of the 1.3-magnitude star Regulus (alpha Leo). The Moon's orbital trajectory takes it through the northern half of Earth's umbral shadow. Although the eclipse is not central, the total phase still lasts 73 minutes. The timings of the major phases of the eclipse are listed below. Penumbral Eclipse Begins: 20:18:11 UT Partial Eclipse Begins: 21:30:22 UT Total Eclipse Begins: 22:44:13 UT Greatest Eclipse: 23:20:56 UT Total Eclipse Ends: 23:57:37 UT Partial Eclipse Ends: 01:11:28 UT Penumbral Eclipse Ends: 02:23:44 UT
The Moon's path through Earth's shadows as well as a map illustrating worldwide visibility of the event are shown in . At the instant of greatest eclipse (23:21 UT) the Moon will lie in the zenith for observers in Nigeria and Cameroon. At this time, the umbral magnitude peaks at 1.2331 as the Moon's southern limb passes 2.4 arc-minutes north of the shadow's central axis. In contrast, the Moon's northern limb will lie 6.9 arc-minutes from the northern edge of the umbra and 32.2 arc-minutes from the shadow centre. Thus the northern sections of the Moon will appear much brighter than the southern part, which lies deeper in the shadow. Since the Moon samples a large range of umbral depths during totality, its appearance will change dramatically with time. It is not possible to predict the exact brightness distribution in the umbra, so observers are encouraged to estimate the Danjon value at different times during totality . Note that it may also be necessary to assign different Danjon values to different portions of the Moon (i.e. north vs. south). During totality, the spring constellations will be well placed for viewing so a number of bright stars can be used for magnitude comparisons. Spica (mv = +0.98) is 40º southeast of the eclipsed Moon, while Arcturus (mv = -0.05) is 49º to the northeast. Alphard or Alpha Hya (mv = +1.99) is 28º to the southwest and Procyon (mv = -0.05) is 50º to the west. Saturn shines at magnitude +0.8 about 24º northwest of the Moon near the western border of Leo. The entire event will be visible from Europe, Africa and western Asia. In eastern Asia, moonset occurs during various stages of the eclipse. For example, the Moon sets while in total eclipse from central China and southeast Asia. Western Australia catches part of the initial partial phases but the Moon sets before totality. Observers in eastern North and South America will find the Moon already partially or totality eclipsed at moonrise. From western North America, only the final penumbral phases are visible. lists predicted umbral immersion and emersion times for 20 well-defined lunar craters. The timing of craters is useful in determining the atmospheric enlargement of Earth's shadow.

Partial Solar Eclipse of March 19

The first solar eclipse of 2007 occurs at the Moon's ascending node in Pisces and is visible from eastern Asia and parts of northern Alaska ). Greatest eclipse takes place at 02:31:56 UT when the eclipse magnitude will reach 0.8754. The penumbral contact times with Earth are listed below. Partial Eclipse Begins: 00:38:26 UT Partial Eclipse Ends: 04:25:00 UT
Local circumstances for a number of cities within the zone of partial eclipse are given in Universal Time in. The Sun's altitude and azimuth, the eclipse magnitude and obscuration are all given at the instant of local maximum eclipse.This event is the 20th partial eclipse of Saros series 149. After one more partial eclipse, the series will produce its first total solar eclipse on 2043 Apr 09.

The second lunar eclipse of the year is another total eclipse. It is a deeper event since it is the first central total eclipse since 2000. The eclipse occurs at the ascending node of Luna's orbit in southern Aquarius. Since the Moon is 2.6 days shy of perigee, it will appear 8% larger (= 1.2 arc-minutes) than it was during March's eclipse. The Moon's trajectory takes it deep into the southern umbral shadow, resulting in a total eclipse that lasts 90 minutes. At mid-totality the Moon's centre passes just 12.8 arc-minutes south of the shadow axis. This places the Moon's northern limb only 3.4 arc-minutes north of the axis while the southern limb is 15.4 arc-minutes from the umbra's southern edge. Since different parts of the Moon will probe radically different portions of Earth's umbral shadow, a large variation in shadow brightness can be expected. As a consequence of this geometry, the southern half of the totally eclipsed Moon will appear considerably brighter than the northern half. Observers are encouraged to estimate the Danjon value at mid-totality . The penumbral phase of August's eclipse begins at about 07:54 UT, but most observers will not be able to visually detect the shadow until about 08:30 UT. A timetable for the major phases of the eclipse is listed below.Penumbral Eclipse Begins: 07:53:39 UT Partial Eclipse Begins: 08:51:16 UT Total Eclipse Begins: 09:52:22 UT Greatest Eclipse: 10:37:22 UT Total Eclipse Ends: 11:22:24 UT Partial Eclipse Ends: 12:23:30 UT Penumbral Eclipse Ends: 13:21:01 UT
The Moon's path through Earth's shadows as well as a map illustrating worldwide visibility of the event are shown in .At the instant of mid-totality (10:37 UT) the Moon will stand near the zenith for observers in French Polynesia. At that time, the umbral eclipse magnitude will be 1.4760. All of North America will witness some portion of the eclipse, but western observers are favored. The early penumbral or umbral phases will be in progress at moonset for observers in Maritime Canada. From the eastern USA, the Great Lakes region and Ontario, the Moon sets in total eclipse. Only observers to the west of the Rockies (including Alaska) will be treated to the entire event. All phases of the eclipse are also visible from islands of the Pacific Ocean, New Zealand and eastern Australia. Various stages of the eclipse are in progress at moonrise for eastern Asia. No eclipse is visible from Europe, Africa and western Asia. lists predicted umbral immersion and emersion times for 20 well-defined lunar craters. The timing of craters is useful in determining the atmospheric enlargement of Earth's shadow .

Partial Solar Eclipse of September 11

The last eclipse of 2007 is a partial solar eclipse at the Moon's descending node in southern Leo. Its visibility is confined to parts of South America, Antarctica and the South Atlantic . Greatest eclipse takes place at 12:31:21 UT when the eclipse magnitude will reach 0.7505. The penumbral contact times with Earth are as follows: Partial Eclipse Begins: 10:25:46 UT Partial Eclipse Ends: 14:36:33 UT
Local circumstances for a number of cities within the zone of partial eclipse are given in . All times are given in Universal Time. The Sun's altitude and azimuth, the eclipse magnitude and obscuration are all given at the instant of maximum eclipse.This event is the sixth partial eclipse of Saros series 154. After one more partial eclipse (2025 Sep 25) The series will produce the first of many annular eclipses eclipse beginning with 2043 Oct 03.
 
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